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How to Format a Resume

altPreviously, we discussed what to include in your resume. Now that we know the content that belongs in a resume, how do we put it all together? That depends on what type of job you are applying for and how you want to come across to that employer. While design-oriented and infographic resumes are really creative and have eye-catching layouts, we are going to focus on the original, clean resume today. This is the route most people take as the Applicant Tracking System industry is growing. By keeping things simple, the system has a better chance of scanning your resume and passing it on to those responsible for hiring.

You already know what you're including on your resume, and you've decided on keeping it clean and simple. So what's next? Let's take a look at the biggest factors in the layout:

  • One Page Maximum
  • Professional Font
  • Clean Layout

One page is plenty of room to give potential employers a snapshot of who you are and why you’re the best candidate. Type up all of your information on one page and see how much space it takes up. If you’re overflowing onto page two without even formatting any of the text, go through and cut out extra verbiage. Overly-talkative babies are cute, but a rambling resume is not.

Next, choose a professional font. If you use a font that has ‘added embellishments’ to its letters, you run the risk of looking unprofessional or childish. Not only that, but the Applicant Tracking Systems that bigger companies use to scan thousands of resumes could cause your resume to be looked over due to an unfamiliar font. Stick with Calibri, Times New Roman, Arial, or any of the other seven fonts on Monster.com’s top ten resume-friendly fonts list. The number one font to stay away from? Comic Sans. If you don't know why, check out this article by Comicsanscriminal.com.

Finally, keep a clean layout. This means that everything should be organized cohesively and not spaced out randomly throughout the page. Stick with one alignment. So if you align the first bit of information on the left, continue this alignment with the rest of your information. Use headers to differentiate the types of information that you’re including (Work Experience, School History, etc.) so that it’s easier for the employer to quickly find what they’re looking for on the page. Hungry for more? Check out Jeff & Mike: The Interview Guys' Resume Format Guide for 2016.

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How to Write a Resume

Resume writing can seem monotonous and intimidating. How are you supposed to fit all of your awesome accomplishments onto just one page? What if you don’t have a lot of different experiences or awards to fill up an entire page? Look no further. This post will discuss the content that employers are looking for when they see your resume for the first time.

“It’s well documented that people only spend about six seconds looking at each resume they receive.” – Forbes.com

Not only do employers look quickly at your resume to determine if it’s worth the read, but they want to be able to sell you to the hiring managers based on your resume alone. If you only have six seconds to impress someone with your resume, you need to be sure that only the essentials are listed so your expertise gets across.
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Content

Personal Information:
No, I don’t mean that you’re wearing your lucky t-shirt as you compose your resume. Include your full name, phone number, email address, and ID Page URL. By including your Foliotek ID Page as a link on your resume, you give employers direct access to your work samples before they even meet you.

School Experience:
List your degree, school, and graduation year. If you received your degree more than ten years ago, leave off the year. If your work experience is more relevant to the job in which you’re applying, list that before school experience.

Work Experience:
Include the name of the company, your position, the years worked at the company, and your outstanding achievements while working there. By quantifying your impact in your job experience, you show future employers specific examples of what you’re capable of doing for their company.

Quick Hitter Tips from the Pros

  • A resume is a very selective body of content. It’s not meant to be comprehensive. If it doesn’t contribute to convincing the hiring manager to talk to you, then take it out says Heifetz.
  • Objectives are so last year. Instead, swap out objective with branding statement or career summary. Giving impressive statistics of your accomplishments and telling employers how your skills will meet their goals as a company is much more effective than stating that you want to be hired and a list of the skills you have.
  • "In a society where social media often blurs the lines between personal and professional life, it’s easy to forget the level of formality and importance your resume should hold, but it is a crucial fact to remember" says blogger and Certified Resume Writer Michele Lando
  • Check out this sample ID Page to see how incorporating your work samples into an online resume is a positive influence on your application.

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